social networking

I blogged this on Strange Attractor before Kev and I went off on hols, but thought it was worth cross posting.

Lloyd Davis, Leisa Reichelt and I have been spending a lot of time plotting just lately, and the result of our machinations was the creation, at midnight in a semi-derelict Gothic mansion and with the help of a bolt of lightening, of Fruitful Seminars. The three of us will be putting on a number of day-long seminars on various Web 2.0 subjects over the next few months, starting on 27 June with my session, Making Social Tools Ubiquitous:

Many companies have heard that social tools, such as wikis and blogs, can help them improve communications, increase collaboration and nurture innovation. As the best of breed tools are often open source, it is easy and cheap to experiment with pilot projects. But what do you do if you don’t get the level of engagement you’d like? And how do you progress from a small-scale pilot to widespread adoption?

This seminar, run by social media expert Suw Charman-Anderson, will take a practical look at the adoption of social tools within enterprise. During the day you will be lead through each stage of Suw’s renowned social media adoption strategy and will have the opportunity to discuss your own specific issues with the group. You will have access to one of the UK’s best known social media consultants in an intimate setting – with no more than 9 people attending – that will allow you to get the very most out of the day. By the end of the seminar you will have a clear set of next steps to take apply to your own blogs or wikis.

Perfect for CXO executives, managers, and social media practitioners who want to know how to foster widespread adoption of social tools in the enterprise. Perhaps you have already installed some blogs or wikis for internal communications and collaboration, but aren’t getting the take-up you had hoped for; or have successfully completed a pilot and want to roll-out to the rest of the company.

We’re keeping the sessions very small, with a maximum of nine people attending each one, so that everyone has the opportunity to fully take part in discussions. Sessions will be quite practical and participants will be able to really get into the nitty gritty. I think that’s something that’s really missing from conferences and the bigger workshops – you don’t get the chance to really get down and dirty with what’s relevant to you. I want people to come away from my seminar with a really clear idea of what they are going to do next, and how they are going to do it.

Registration is already open – it’s very easy to sign up and payment can be made by PayPal or cheque/bank transfer. The fee includes lunch, tea and coffee.

We also now have a Fruitful Seminars mailing list on Google that is open to anyone to join, where we’ll keep you abreast of progress and you can let us know what you’re thinking.

Happy birthday to hash-me!

by Suw on April 3, 2005

My IRC channel, so imaginatively named #suwcharman, is celebrating its first birthday today! Happy birthday hash-me!! Spawned from #joiito originally as a place where I could talk to people away from the frenzy of Joi's channel, I never imagined it would actually end up being like a little home away from home where I could hang out with some way cool people. (In fact, I never thought it would last more than a week or so!)
Thanks to everyone on IRC for making my channel so much fun, and thanks to the guys at Freenode for running the servers in the first place.

43 Things

by Suw on January 10, 2005

There are more than 43 things that I want to do with my life, but it might take me a while to get them all into 43Things. Still you can always grab the RSS feed and see how my list progresses.

Proof

by Suw on December 30, 2004

Just to prove that people really do use my IRC channel, #suwcharman on irc.freenode.net, and freely admit doing so.
marekj on IRC #suwcharman channel
Marekj, mid-chat.

It's been a while…

by Suw on November 21, 2004

…Since I last posted about what I'm up to, rather than stuff about ads or whatever. Been amazingly busy lately, so blogging has had to take a back seat really. So, a quick update:
Last weekend we were filming all weekend in London. We had to repeat some of the same scenes that we'd filmed in August, but which hadn't come out right. It was good to redo them – for a start this time round I knew how to use the camera so that made it much easier. Secondly, I think the acting was better too. Well, in so far as my acting could be described as 'better' – I'm not sure that there's gradations of terrible.
Saturday night, Vince and I went into London with John Rochester, Gary Turner and Tom Reynolds for a pint or two. Tom passed on Joey's present of a Shaun of the Dead trucker's cap, which was gratefully received:
Aim for the head
Then dinner with Ross Mayfield on Tuesday night, which was a great evening out. Ross is a complete darling and a fascinating conversationalist. Wish I'd had a bit more time to talk to him, but I guess I'll just have to go over to the States and look him up on home turf. Also enjoyed speaking to a whole bunch of other really cool people. Photos from the event on Ross', Dave's and James' Flickr streams and on Beth's site. As usual, I took my camera and never got it out of my bag.
Did some more filming today – pick up shots of Vince and some 'documentary' footage to go with our outtakes. At this rate, all that footage cut together will be longer than the film itself. Still, it was kinda fun. Scarily easy to talk bollocks about the film for 40 uninterrupted minutes.
Off into town tomorrow and Tuesday. Svet's back in a week so gotta make the most of it.

Dinner with Ross Mayfield

by Suw on November 12, 2004

Ross is over in the UK for a brief visit so there are plans afoot for dinner on Tuesday 16 Nov with him and a bunch of other cool people somewhere in central London. If you're interested in social tools in business, or just want to hang with Ross, then let Allan Engelhardt know and don't forget to include your email address so he can tell you where dinner's actually going to be.

YASN without a point (and two with)

by Suw on October 23, 2004

In 1980 a small toy invented by Erno Rubik, a Hungarian obsessed with 3D geometry, became a smash hit. The almost impossible to solve Rubik's Cube was everywhere – in the shops, on TV, in the record books, but mainly in bits on frustrated children's floors.
I, like millions of other kids, had a Rubik's Cube and I, like millions of other kids, never managed to actually solve the problem. Instead I resorted to either taking the thing apart or trying unsuccessfully to peel off the coloured plastic stuck to the cube's faces so as to rearrange the colour without rearranging the cube.
Read the rest on Strange Attractor.